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Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines

  • Total solar eclipse: When is it, where is it happening and how to watch in the UK

    Total solar eclipse: When is it, where is it happening and how to watch in the UKWhat's happening? Today, all of North America will witness an eclipse of the sun for the first time in 99 years, where the Moon will pass in front of the Sun casting darkness across swathes of the Earth's surface. Dubbed the Great American Eclipse, the moment will see the Sun, the Moon and the Earth become perfectly aligned in a once-in-a-lifetime celestial spectacle seen from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean. Although we won't see a perfect alignment in the UK, we will be able to see a partial eclipse (where the moon covers only a part of the sun). 10 amazing places in America to watch the 2017 solar eclipse Who will see it? Everyone in North America, parts of South America, Africa and Europe - including the UK - will see at least a partial solar eclipse, where the moon covers only a part of the sun. However, 14 states across the United States will experience a total solar eclipse with more than two minutes of darkness descending in the middle of the day over the course of 100 minutes. More than 12 million Americans live inside the path of totality and more than half of the nation live within 400 miles of it. Millions more are expected to travel to cities along the path to witness the phenomenon.  Where and when to see the eclipse What causes an eclipse? The diameter of the Sun is 400 times that of the Moon but it lies 400 times further away - which means if you are in exactly the right alignment on the surface of the Earth at the right time, you will see the two celestial bodies overlap exactly. What creates a total solar eclipse Where can I see the eclipse in the UK? Sadly Brits won't get a total eclipse like our friends across the pond, but we will be treated to a slight partial eclipse which will still be worth watching.  It will be visible in parts of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland from around 19:35 on August 21 - but make sure you're in a spot where there's no cloud.  UK eclipse circumstances for August 21 2017 What areas will see total blackout? Anyone within the path of totality will see the sky become dark for several minutes as the moon completely covers the sun. The path is relatively thin, around 70 miles wide, and stretches from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. It will first be seen at Lincoln Beach, Oregon at 9:05 PDT, with totality beginning at 10:16 PDT. Over the next 90 minutes, it will cross through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North and end near Charleston, South Carolina at 14:28 EDT. The lunar shadow will leave the US at 04:09 EDT. Its longest duration will be near Carbondale, Illinois, where the sun will be completely covered for two minutes and 40 seconds. What time can I see the total eclipse? Here are the mid-eclipse times for some of the major towns and cities along the path of totality, according to Nasa. All times are local.  Where to see it | The Great American solar eclipse Will there be a live stream? Yes - Nasa will host an Eclipse Megacast for four hours during the eclipse which will be picked up by local, national and international TV stations. You can also follow all the action via the Telegraph. How can I see it safely? Never look directly at the Sun, even through sunglasses or dark material such as a bin liner or photographic negative. Makeshift filters may not screen out the harmful infrared radiation that can burn the retina of the eye risking permanent eye damage and blindness. Also, viewers must never use binoculars or a telescope. Wear special eclipse viewing glasses - not ordinary sunglasses - or construct a simple pinhole camera which projects an image of the Sun onto a blank piece of paper. Solar eclipse: how to watch the eclipse safely When will Britain next see a solar eclipse? There was a pretty spectacular eclipse in Britain in March 2015, but the last total eclipse in the UK was in August 1999. You might be waiting a while for the next decent one too - it won't take place until August 12, 2026. On that date up to 95 per cent of the Sun will be obscured. Britain will not see a total solar eclipse until September 23, 2090. How we watched the 1999 solar eclipse - in 90 seconds 01:42 Total solar eclipses in history Eclipses have both fascinated and terrified civilisations for centuries. When King Henry I of England, the son of William the Conqueror, died in 1133, his death happened to coincide with a total solar eclipse plummeting the nation into darkness for four minutes and 38 seconds. Historian William of Malmesbury wrote in 1140 that "the darkness was so great that people at first thought the world was ending."




  • Elon Musk and 115 other experts ask the UN to ban killer robots in open letter

    Elon Musk and 115 other experts ask the UN to ban killer robots in open letterElon Musk, Google DeepMind co-founder Mustafa Suleyman, and 114 other leading AI and robotics experts have joined together to ask the UN to ban the use of so-called killer robots in an open letter published today. The group is concerned about the potential use of lethal autonomous weapons and how they might be applied in the future, and they penned a short note released by the Future of Life Institute. The text was made public to kick off the opening of the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI 2017) in Melbourne, Australia, according to a press release. "Lethal autonomous weapons" refers to the drones, autonomous machine guns, tanks, and other forms of weaponry controlled by AI on next-generation battlefields.  Musk, for one, is famously wary of AI's potential to go bad, recently calling it "the greatest threat we face as a civilization," above even nuclear weapons — but the open letter is the first time a group of AI and robotics companies have joined forces to petition the UN specifically about autonomous weapons, according to the release.  SEE ALSO: The world's most automated country moves toward setting a 'robot tax' The UN’s Review Conference of the Convention on Conventional Weapons had unanimously agreed to start formal discussions on the prohibition of autonomous weapons, and 19 of the member countries have already supported banning the killer robots outright. The group was slated to meet on Aug. 21, but has been delayed until November, according to Fortune. The open letter, which was signed by representatives from companies worth collectively billions of dollars across 26 countries, could put even more pressure to make a prohibition happen. One of the autonomous lethal weapons already out in the world.Image: future of life instituteThe actual text of the letter is short and stark. You can read it here, but we've included the most essential passage below: Co-signer Yoshua Bengio, a deep learning expert who founded Element AI, is concerned about more than just the immediate damage lethal autonomous weapons might cause. He cited the potential to "hurt the further development of AI’s good applications" by focusing on warfare and the inevitable backlash against the technology as a major reason for his participation in the effort.  The Future of Life Institute published a similar letter in 2015, which was signed by Musk, Stephen Hawking, and others with a message warning against the broader dangers of AI, not just those created for warfare.  The danger posed by non-military AI is much less pressing, which makes some of Musk's statements feel overblown and ridiculous and his self-important spat with Mark Zuckerberg more of a media spectacle than a debate with real stakes. But the potential for autonomous weapons to do damage, as the open letter states, is here now. Hopefully, the UN listens to the experts.  WATCH: Elon Musk's self-taught AI bot destroyed an esports pro in 'Dota 2'




  • Police uncover gas arsenal at bomb factory as Barcelona mourns

    Police uncover gas arsenal at bomb factory as Barcelona mournsSpanish police said Sunday they had uncovered a cache of 120 gas canisters at a house believed to be the bomb-making factory of suspects in terror attacks that claimed 14 lives, as Barcelona mourned victims of the rampage. The suspected jihadists had been preparing bombs for "one or more attacks in Barcelona", regional police chief Josep Lluis Trapero told reporters, revealing that traces of TATP explosive had also been found.




  • 'Catching' a U-2 fresh back from America's air wars

    'Catching' a U-2 fresh back from America's air warsBy Phil Stewart AL DHAFRA AIR BASE, United Arab Emirates (Reuters) - It may not sound possible to "catch" an American spy plane while driving a Dodge Charger. The plane itself was designed in the 1950s to grip the lightest parts of the atmosphere some 70,000 feet above the Earth, so, in the words of one of the U-2 pilots, "it really doesn't want to stop flying." Enter the Dodge Charger, which along with another so-called "chase car" helped guide the spy plane down to the runway, speeding at about 90 miles per hour - an operation perfected over the many years of the famed U-2 Dragon Lady's operations.




  • Plenty To Know Before The Solar Eclipse

    Plenty To Know Before The Solar EclipseMonday's solar eclipse has generated a great deal of attention.




  • South Africa grants Grace Mugabe diplomatic immunity after she allegedly attacked young model

    South Africa grants Grace Mugabe diplomatic immunity after she allegedly attacked young modelGrace Mugabe, the first lady of Zimbabwe, returned home last night from South Africa after being granted diplomatic immunity after being accused of assaulting a model with an extension cable in a Johannesburg hotel. However last night lawyers announced they would launch a legal challenge this week to the immunity which allowed Mr Mugabe to escape facing any charges of assault. The immunity, granted after she arrived in South Africa more then a week ago on private business was a political decision not a legal one said Lorna Ferguson, a South African lawyer. “It was irrational and in contravention of South African laws for her to be granted immunity in the face of what were serious criminal charges laid against her for alleged assault a week ago. Gabriella Engels is seen with an injury to her forehead  Credit: Debbie Engels via AP "I consulted the law and with a veteran South Africa foreign affairs expert who said that immunity cannot be granted retrospectively.” Mrs Mugabe is accused of assaulting and injuring Gabriella Engels, a 20-year-old model who was visiting Mrs Mugabe’s two sons, Robert Jnr and Chatunga in a top Johannesburg hotel a week ago. Ms Engels laid charges against Mrs Mugabe after she had her face stitched up in hospital.  Mrs Mugabe avoided going to court and was rescued when her husband, President Robert Mugabe, arrived in South Africa to attend a regional conference and arranged immunity for his wife which was officially announced on Saturday. Grace Mugabe, shown here in October 2014, returned home from South Africa Credit: JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images Ms Engels case has been taken up by a non Governmental organisation Afriforum which says it will go to court for the injured woman re the immunity, and will also charge Mrs Mugabe in both criminal and civil cases. President Robert Mugabe and his wife Grace, sneaked out of South Africa via South Africa’s main military airport near the capital Pretoria, in the very early hours of Sunday morning. Alex Magisa, a senior Zimbabwean and legal academic at the University of Kent, said one of the tragedies of the Grace Mugabe assault case in South Africa is that few people in Zimbabwe know about it.  No mention of the case has been made on the only TV station and all radio stations and daily newspapers it controls. "Much of the 67 percent of people who live in rural areas have to rely on traditional sources (of information) which simply refused to cover the story. MUGABE TIMELINE "Few incidents illustrate the totalitarian face of the Zimbabwean regime as this current case involving Grace Mugabe’s embarrassing moment in South Africa where she allegedly beat up a young woman whom she found in the company of her two sons,” he said. Mrs Mugabe and various web sites and twitter feeds which support her in Zimbabwe say the first lady was attacked by Ms Engels. Ahead of Mrs Mugabe’s return home, South Africa and Zimbabwe seized and grounded passenger aircraft in Johannesburg and Harare. Only after diplomatic immunity for Mrs Mugabe was gazetted did South Africa’s civil aviation authority allow the Air Zimbabwe Boeing 767 it had grounded early Saturday, to take off after midnight on Sunday. Harare had retaliated by seizing a South African Airways aircraft at the Harare International Airport on Saturday and refused to clear it for take-off until after the Mugabe’s were on their way back to Harare. Flights between the two countries have now resumed.




  • The eclipse: From ancient paganism to American history, it's been a thing

    The eclipse: From ancient paganism to American history, it's been a thingNothing reminds us that we are on a celestial island surrounded by the abyss like watching our planet's energy source turn into a gaping black hole.  But don't take my word for it. From occult and pagan lore to American history and yes, Hollywood, solar eclipses have been harbingers of doom, transformation, and revolution since time immemorial.  And can't you just ... feel it? SEE ALSO: 20 questions you're too embarrassed to ask about the solar eclipse At a time when the fabric of American reality appears on the verge of collapse, maybe we can take comfort in the ancient beliefs that an eclipse isn't just a phenomenon. It's a sign. Everyone, particularly the Deadhead-like eclipse hunters called "Shadow Chasers," is blowing their lids over this particular one taking place on Monday. We are all now part of a tradition that has governed humans since the dawn of man — looking upward to remember that we are at the mercy of a cosmic dance indifferent to our inner worlds.  As one Redditor put it on the "occult" thread, the eclipse is a coming together of "light and dark, symbolizing the unification of good and evil." Other online occult experts like the Academy of the Pagan Path say that since solar eclipses "can only occur during the day, on a new moon," it's a great time to take advantage of that unique blend of energy toward "planting new seeds and ideas." Even NASA admits that, while it may not cause any evident physical effects in people, there's something here: The eclipse even has our no-nonsense nerds sounding like vague, prophetic philosophers.  Much like our future, outer space is hella femaleImage: GETTY IMAGESBut NASA's right about one thing: Belief shapes reality. Wars waged in the name of religion have slaughtered millions since the genesis of society. Pagan rituals practiced thousands of years ago still inspire the same psychological effects in modern people that they did to our earliest ancestors. So, in celebration of our astrological insignificance, let's dive into a brief, abridged human history of the solar eclipse. May your reckoning be delicious. A tale as old as pre-history It's hard to choose from the countless, ageless, globally-shared legends about solar eclipses. The most ancient records endure to this day, etched in stone.  Five thousand years ago, neolithic man built a circle of cairns in Loughcrew, Ireland. Despite lacking all the precise modern knowledge needed to predict an eclipse accurately, the ancient Irish created a monument that aligned with the solar eclipse of 3340 B.C.E. A millennia before the Chinese even started using paper, they carved solar eclipses into "oracle" bones that date back to 2100 B.C.  Drombeg prehistoric stone circle, County Cork, IrelandImage: UIG via Getty ImagesEclipses were believed to be signals of turmoil, but political turmoil in particular.  In ancient Chinese culture, the sun symbolized the Emperor and the moon a dragon, so the solar eclipses was seen attacks on the ruler to be warded off. Two court astronomers were beheaded for failing to anticipate them. Many shared this common view of solar eclipses as a devouring of divine beings. Vietnamese legends believed the culprit to be a giant frog, while the Vikings saw wolves. Hindu belief interprets eclipses as the decapitated head of the deity Rahu being chucked into the sky. The ancient Greeks viewed the uncanny event as a sign of certain doom. The poet Archilochus described the 647 B.C.E. eclipse as such:  It could also work in reverse. In 585 B.C., “The Battle of the Eclipse” saw the warring Lydians and Medes lay down their weapons, and end a decade-long battle in the husk of the unnatural twilight. The truly great American eclipses Closer to home, eclipses have been tied to events of revolution. Two reportedly occurred during the Revolutionary War, and were used to demonstrate a cultural shift away from the religious and mystical and toward the scientific. But beyond justifying American exceptionalism, solar eclipses are embedded in the African American struggle for liberty, too. In 1791, self-taught black astronomer Benjamin Banneker correctly calculated the eclipse date, contradicting most respected mathematicians. Banneker then sent Thomas Jefferson a mic-drop of a letter, along with a copy of his meticulous work. Banneker wrote that he was "recommending to you and all others, to wean yourselves from those narrow prejudices which you have imbibed with respect to [my brethren]." Benjamin Banneker's Alamack, 1792. Sent to Thomas Jefferson proving Af-Ams created intellectually equal. https://t.co/TotyNGqZYM … pic.twitter.com/3UZFjCvG2M — Leandra Bernstein (@LeandraB_sbg) August 18, 2017 And most famously — as depicted in Nate Parker's The Birth of a Nation — enslaved African-American Nat Turner interpreted one eclipse he witnessed in February 1831 as a black man's hand reaching for the sun, a sign that he should launch a revolt.  After a second eclipse in August, his plans came to fruition, and 70 freed slaves joined him in liberating plantations all over Virginia, a moment widely interpreted as a precursor to the Civil War. We suggest Trump and his neo-Nazi buddies take note. Total eclipse of the pop culture heart As a modern iteration of myth, eclipses have also captured the imagination of our greatest contemporary creators. (And no, we're not talking about Bonnie Tyler's love ballad.) Solar eclipses are even vaguely referenced in the largest cultural phenomenon of our time, Game of Thrones, with its opening sequence showing the orbital ribbons of an astrolabe blotting out a spinning sun over a map of Westeros in certain frames. Stanley Kubrik's groundbreaking 2001: A Space Odyssey opens on the eclipse of star from space. The title card explodes across the scene, with Richard Strauss' famed trumpets sounding off a revolution in the entire filmmaking industry. Known as one of the most highly ranked Simpsons episodes ever, "Marge vs. the Monorail" opens on yet another example of the blue-haired matriarch sacrificing her own enjoyment and self-fullfilment for her family.  She gives the ever-unprepared Homer her protective eyewear. But, unable to keep herself from missing out on the wonder, Marge looks up anyway — only to blind herself and incite the revelatory character arc of the episode. Meanwhile Mad Men, which often referenced cultural cosmic events (like the first satellite image of Earth), featured the July 1963 solar eclipse in the Season 3 episode "Seven Twenty Three." In the episode, each character's reaction to the celestial reckoning reveals core aspects of their character.  Betty must have her eyes shielded by Henry. Don, on the other hand, thinks he is above the rules of mere mortals, and looks directly into it with sunglasses while the others aren't watching. Who knows what the coming solar eclipse will inspire in 2017, a year of unprecedented events. Maybe for once, these notions of political upheaval and transformations will finally be quantifiably true. We're holding out for a rapture that vaporizers the haters right off the planet.  WATCH: How to watch the solar eclipse without burning your eyes out




  • Balz: Judgment on Trump has been 'extremely harsh' from fellow Republicans

    Balz: Judgment on Trump has been 'extremely harsh' from fellow RepublicansThe Powerhouse Roundtable debates the week in politics on "This Week."




  • Couple Who Engaged In Sexual Act Aboard Southwest Airlines Flight Questioned

    Couple Who Engaged In Sexual Act Aboard Southwest Airlines Flight QuestionedThe airline said the incident occurred on a flight from Atlanta to Las Vegas and apologized to other passengers aboard the flight.




  • Saudi says Qatar blocks planes from transporting pilgrims

    Saudi says Qatar blocks planes from transporting pilgrimsSaudi Arabia on Sunday said Qatar had refused to allow its planes to land in Doha to transport Qatari Muslims to Mecca for the annual hajj pilgrimage. "Saudi Arabian Airlines director general Saleh al-Jasser has said that the airline has thus far been unable to schedule flights to transport Qatari pilgrims from Hamad International Airport in Doha," read a report on the SPA news agency. "Qatari authorities have not allowed the aircraft to land as it did not have the right paperwork, although the paperwork was filed days ago," SPA said.




  • Community Helps Man Arrested After Leaving Kids Home Alone to Go to Work

    Community Helps Man Arrested After Leaving Kids Home Alone to Go to WorkHis wife reportedly has stage four cancer.




  • Flying dogs caught in action

    Flying dogs caught in actionThese excited pooches are flying without wings in this series of hilarious images. Taken in July by photographer Peter Mueller, Each photo shows the canines’ exuberant facial expressions, as they appear to be leaping through the air.




  • 11 Unique Pulled Pork Recipes That Aren’t Sandwiches

    11 Unique Pulled Pork Recipes That Aren’t SandwichesSince pulled pork is so tasty and versatile, it’d be a shame to waste it on the same old barbecue sandwich recipe you’ve been using for generations. Since the sky is essentially the limit, make it into a chili or a soup, add some spices for a Mexican-style meal, or throw it into your favorite comfort food. Get our Pulled Pork Nachos recipe.




  • Apple Watch sales expected to jump by 33% in 2018

    Apple Watch sales expected to jump by 33% in 2018

    For a company that typically likes boasting about unit sales, Apple has made a point of never releasing Apple Watch sales figures. Even though Tim Cook has routinely said that Apple Watch sales have steadily increased since its initial release -- even going so far as to categorize Apple Watch sales as 'off the charts' a few months ago -- the company has remained curiously quiet about how many are actually flying off the shelves.

    Regardless, a recent report claims that Apple Watch sales in the coming year are poised to increase by an impressive 33%. Citing sources in the supply chain, Digitimes relays that Apple Watch sales in 2018 may check in at 20 million units, a solid increase from the 15 million units  Apple is expected to sell once 2017 comes to a close.

    With Apple ready to launch its third-generation Apple Watch, Apple's overall smartwatch shipments are expected to rise to 4.5 million units in the fourth quarter and hit 15 million for the whole year 2017, according to sources from the upstream supply chain.

    The sources expect the volume to rise to 20 million units in 2018.

    As for overall Apple Watch sales, Strategy Analytics published a research note earlier this month claiming that cumulative Apple Watch sales now stand in the 30 million range since the device launched in April of 2015. That said, if projections above are anywhere close to being accurate, Apple will have sold 50 million Apple Watch devices by the time 2019 rolls around.

    On a related note, Apple is reportedly prepping the release of its next-gen Apple Watch, a device that will reportedly offer up improvements in performance, battery life and more. Most notably, the third-gen Apple Watch will include an LTE option.




  • Indiana's Donnelly, a top GOP target, starts re-election bid

    Indiana's Donnelly, a top GOP target, starts re-election bidINDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly is positioning himself as a moderate who will fight for "common sense and compromise" as he launches a re-election bid in a state that President Donald Trump easily won last year.




  • Philippine churches to ring bells to protest drug killings

    Philippine churches to ring bells to protest drug killingsMANILA, Philippines (AP) — A Philippine Catholic leader said Sunday that church bells would be rung every night for three months across his northern district to raise alarm over a sharp spike in police killings of drug suspects, adding to a growing outcry over President Rodrigo Duterte's bloody crackdown.




  • The most expensive British car in history: 1956 Aston Martin DBR1 sells for record-breaking £17.5m

    The most expensive British car in history: 1956 Aston Martin DBR1 sells for record-breaking £17.5mA classic car raced by Sir Stirling Moss and described as the "most important Aston Martin ever produced" became the most valuable British-made car ever when it sold for $22.5m (£17.5m) at the annual auction at Monterey Car Week on Friday. The 1956 Aston Martin DBR1, is the firm's equivalent to the Ferrari 250 GTO and Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR and just five were built between 1956 and 1958. This one sold is chassis number one - a purpose-built model developed by racing design chief, Ted Cutting. DBR1/1 was designed to win at Le Mans, but while it failed to take the chequered flag in the 24-hour race, a later model did. Credit: South West News Service It is the first of a series of five racing cars, one of which won the 1959 24 Hours of Le Mans sports car race. This particular car won the Nurburgring 1000 kilometre race that same year. It was subsequently sold, converted and made legal for street use in 1962. The DBR1's inline six-cylinder engine evolved from its debut in 1956 though its last race in 1959, ending up at 2,992cc and 268hp. The original engine is included in the price of the car - but it currently has a modern engine with no historical value, so it can be raced without concern. This new engine raised the car's output to 301hp. The 1956 DBR1 was built to be raced at Le Mans and has been labelled the "most important" Aston Martin ever produced Credit: Tim Scott / RM Sotheby's / SWNS.com RM Sotheby's had valued the Aston Martin - which is believed to be the first DBR1 to go under the hammer- at more than £15 million.   The DBR1 joins a handful of other classic Aston vehicles, including a 1959 DB4GT, which sold for an impressive $6.765 million, and a 2006 DBR9, which went for a cool $616,000. By the end of the night, RM Sotheby’s Monterey sale generated over $60 million in sales.  The interior of the Aston is spotless Credit: Tim Scott / RM Sotheby's / SWNS.com Meanwhile, at rival auction house Bonham's on the same day, a 1995 McLaren F1  - the first of its model to sell in the US - sold for $15.62m (£12.2m). The F1 was the most sophisticated car the world had ever seen, when it was launched in the early 1990s. It was also the fastest, with the F1 capable of a accelerating from 0-62mph in 3.2 seconds and hitting a top speed of 243mph. Just 65 road cars were built and this model, known as chassis 044, remains as original as the day it left the Woking factory in 1995. The 1995 McLaren F1 which sold for a record price Credit: Bonhams The Aston Martin and McLaren are owned by different people and had both been valued at around £15 million making them the two most valuable cars to ever to be sold at auction. Both cars broke the current record for most expensive British car, which currently stands at $21.7m for the 1956 Le Mans-winning Jaguar D-Type.   aston martin db3s auction  




  • SeaWorld: Former trainer says deaths of three killer whales a 'disgrace to humanity'

    SeaWorld: Former trainer says deaths of three killer whales a 'disgrace to humanity'A former killer whale trainer at SeaWorld has spoken out about conditions at the attraction, after the deaths of three orcas there this year. Last week, Kasatka became the third killer whale at the Californian theme park to die. The orca was 41 years old, making her the oldest killer whale at SeaWorld in San Diego.




  • Iraq's Kurds might put off independence vote in return for concessions from Baghdad: official

    Iraq's Kurds might put off independence vote in return for concessions from Baghdad: officialBy Maher Chmaytelli SULAIMANIYA, Iraq (Reuters) - Iraq's Kurds may consider the possibility of postponing a planned Sept. 25 referendum on independence in return for financial and political concessions from the central government in Baghdad, a senior Kurdish official said. A Kurdish delegation is visiting Baghdad to sound out proposals from Iraqi leaders that might convince the Kurds to postpone the vote, according to Mala Bakhtiar, executive secretary of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) Politburo. The United States and other Western nations fear the vote could ignite a fresh conflict with Baghdad and possibly neighboring countries, diverting attention from the ongoing war against Islamic State (IS) militants in Iraq and Syria.




  • Iran parliament clears oil, foreign ministers for Rouhani's new cabinet

    Iran parliament clears oil, foreign ministers for Rouhani's new cabinetBy Babak Dehghanpisheh BEIRUT (Reuters) - The Iranian parliament voted on Sunday to keep the oil and foreign ministers, two of pragmatist President Hassan Rouhani's key members of cabinet, in their posts. Oil Minister Bijan Zanganeh has been credited with the boost in Iran's crude output since many global sanctions were lifted last year and with a multi-billion-dollar deal with France's Total to develop South Pars, the world's largest gas field. Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif was Iran's lead negotiator in the landmark 2015 agreement in which Western powers agreed to rescind sanctions on the Islamic Republic in exchange for curbs on its disputed nuclear program.




  • Steve Bannon reveals 'biggest White House divisions in history' after being fired by Donald Trump

    Steve Bannon reveals 'biggest White House divisions in history' after being fired by Donald TrumpDonald Trump's ousted chief strategist Steve Bannon has spoken out against divisions in the White House, claiming "no administration in history has been so divided among itself". Within hours of leaving the Trump administration, Mr Bannon returned to the helm of Breitbart News, a far-right news site he ran before becoming the main architect of Mr Trump's 2016 presidential campaign. Mr Trump appeared to support the move, tweeting: "Steve Bannon will be a tough and smart new voice at Breitbart News... maybe even better than ever before.




  • Armed group in Uganda briefly abduct South Sudanese rebel, he says

    Armed group in Uganda briefly abduct South Sudanese rebel, he saysBy Jason Patinkin KAMPALA (Reuters) - Armed civilians briefly abducted a South Sudanese rebel spokesman in Uganda and told him to stop talking to the media, two rebel officials said on Saturday. Rebel spokesman Lam Paul Gabriel accused South Sudan's government of being behind his abduction, but said the group of six armed men and a woman who took him from his home appeared to be from Uganda, which borders South Sudan. Gabriel, who said the group had told him to stop talking to the media, said Ugandan police ensured he returned home safely.




  • Young Taiwanese choose China jobs over politics

    Young Taiwanese choose China jobs over politicsTaiwan has long seen its international allies switching allegiance to an ascendant Beijing, but now there are also fears of a brain drain of the island's youth as they pursue careers in rival China. Cross-strait tensions have soared since China-sceptic Tsai Ing-wen took power last year, with Beijing cutting all official communication. China still sees the self-ruling island as part of its territory to be reunified, but young people in particular have increasingly developed a sense of pride in their Taiwanese identity.




  • Iraq begins battle to retake Tal Afar, IS bastion near Mosul: PM

    Iraq begins battle to retake Tal Afar, IS bastion near Mosul: PMIraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi announced early Sunday the start of a battle to retake Tal Afar, a key Northern Iraqi bastion of the Islamic State (IS) group and one of their last remaining strongholds in the region. The announcement comes a month after the capture by Iraqi forces of second city Mosul further east in a major blow to the jihadists. In a televised speech, Abadi, dressed in military uniform and standing in front of an Iraqi flag and map of the country, announced "the start of an operation to free Tal Afar".




  • Indian woman wins divorce over lack of toilet

    Indian woman wins divorce over lack of toiletAn Indian court has given a woman permission to divorce her husband because their home did not have a toilet, forcing her to seek relief outdoors. Justice Rajendra Kumar Sharma said women in villages often endured physical pain waiting until darkness to relieve themselves outdoors. The judge labelled open defecation -- a major health problem in India -- disgraceful and deemed it torture to deny women a safe environment for relief, the woman's lawyer Rajesh Sharma told AFP.




  • Oxford University employee and US academic brought to Chicago to face murder charges

    Oxford University employee and US academic brought to Chicago to face murder chargesTwo employees of elite universities charged in the fatal stabbing of a 26-year-old hair stylist were returned to Chicago early Saturday to face charges of first-degree murder in the brutal killing. Chicago police escorted fired Northwestern University professor Wyndham Lathem, 43, and Oxford University financial officer Andrew Warren, 56, from Northern California, where they surrendered peacefully on Aug. 4 after an eight-day, nationwide manhunt. Detectives were questioning the men Saturday. They could appear in court as early as Sunday. The men are accused of killing Trenton James Cornell-Duranleau, a Michigan native who had been living in Chicago, last month in Lathem's high-rise Chicago condo. Chicago police have said Cornell-Duranleau suffered more than 40 stab wounds, including "mutilations," to his upper body. Authorities say the attack was so violent the blade of the knife they believe was used was broken. They found Cornell-Duranleau's body July 27 after the building's front desk received an anonymous call that a crime had occurred on the 10th floor. He had been dead more than 12 hours. By then, authorities say Lathem and Warren had fled the city. According to autopsy results released Friday by the Cook County medical examiner's office, Cornell-Duranleau had methamphetamine in his system at the time of his death. Wyndham Lathem Credit: Chicago Police Department/PA Police say Lathem and Cornell-Duranleau, who moved to Chicago from the Grand Rapids, Michigan, area about a year ago, had a personal relationship, though they have not described the nature of it or a motive for the attack. It's unclear what the relationship was between Lathem, Cornell-Duranleau and Warren, who's British. He arrived in the U.S. three days before the killing, after being reported missing in Great Britain. Lathem, a microbiologist who's been on Northwestern's faculty since 2007 but was not teaching at the time of the attack, was terminated by the university for fleeing from police when there was an arrest warrant out for him. Investigators said the day after the crime was committed Lathem and Warren drove about 80 miles (128 kilometers) northwest of Chicago to Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. One of the men made a $1,000 donation to a local library in Cornell-Duranleau's name. Lake Geneva authorities said the man making the donation didn't give his name. Trenton James Cornell-Duranleau Credit: Facebook At another point after the killing, Lathem sent a video to friends and relatives apologizing for his involvement in the crime, which he called the "biggest mistake of my life." The video raised concern among investigators that Lathem might kill himself. Lathem and Warren both appeared in court in California last week, where they agreed to return to Illinois to face charges. An attorney for Lathem, Kenneth H. Wine, called him a "gentle soul" and said "what he is accused of is totally contrary to the way he has lived his entire life." Wine said Lathem intends to plead not guilty to the charges. Warren was represented by a public defender during a brief appearance in a San Francisco court. She said he is "presumed innocent," but declined to comment further. 




  • An Oregon Wildfire is Blazing in the Eclipse's Path of Totality

    An Oregon Wildfire is Blazing in the Eclipse's Path of TotalityAbout 600 residents in the area were already evacuated




  • Boston 'free speech' rally abandoned by right-wing demonstrators outnumbered by 15,000 counter-protesters

    Boston 'free speech' rally abandoned by right-wing demonstrators outnumbered by 15,000 counter-protestersAs the official start time of the contentious “Free Speech Rally” in Boston approached, the winner in the battle of words between organisers and counter-demonstrators had already been determined. If hateful speech aimed at Jewish people or minorities was chanted at Boston Common park, it was not audible at one of the largest rallies being held just one week after the deadly demonstrations in Charleston, Virginia, where neo-Nazis marched bearing torches, and where one woman was killed. Instead, an estimated 15,000 counter-protesters dominated the air with anti-Nazi and anti-fascist chants.




  • German writer critical of Turkey's Erdogan arrested in Spain

    German writer critical of Turkey's Erdogan arrested in SpainBy Thomas Escritt BERLIN (Reuters) - German-Turkish author Dogan Akhanli was arrested in Spain on Saturday after Turkey issued an Interpol warrant for the writer, a critic of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government, fanning an already fierce row between the NATO allies. The arrest of the German national in Granada was part of a "targeted hunt against critics of the Turkish government living abroad in Europe," Akhanli's lawyer Ilias Uyar told magazine Der Spiegel, which first reported Akhanli's detention. Any country can issue an Interpol "red notice", but extradition by Spain would only follow if Ankara could convince Spanish courts it had a real case against him.




  • Muslims fear anti-Islam backlash in tolerant Barcelona

    Muslims fear anti-Islam backlash in tolerant BarcelonaPrayer time is approaching but Raja Miah, an imam at a tiny mosque in the heart of Barcelona does not expect a big turnout. Since the twin attacks in Barcelona and the nearby seaside resort of Cambrils claimed by the Islamic State group, the Muslim community in central Barcelona's neighbourhood of Raval fears an anti-Islam backlash. "People are very scared," said Miah, 23, as he sat in a small room at the mosque in Raval as a small group of children in an adjoining room studied the Koran.




  • Solar Eclipse To Cost US Nearly $700M In Lost Productivity

    Solar Eclipse To Cost US Nearly $700M In Lost ProductivityResearch says the time loss could be a good way to boost company morale.




  • Man Caught Smuggling 13 Pounds of Meth Into US Via Drone

    Man Caught Smuggling 13 Pounds of Meth Into US Via DroneDrones generally haven't appealed to smugglers because their noise attracts attention.




  • Boston 'free speech' rally dwarfed by thousands of counter-protesters

    Boston 'free speech' rally dwarfed by thousands of counter-protestersEight people were arrested at a "Free Speech Rally" in Boston that organisers said "fell  apart" after it as dwarfed by a counter-protest against white nationalism. About 30 people attending the rally huddled on Boston Common's bandstand, their words drowned out by more than 10,000 counter-protesters. The two sides were kept more than 50 metres apart by fencing and police.  Trouble flared only briefly. At the end of the hour-long rally when the speakers were hustled into a police van that was quickly surrounded by a mob shouting "make them walk".  After a tense standoff police cleared a route away with a rolling blockade of motorbikes and bicycles.  Police said they made 27  arrests.  State and city police inspect people arriving for a "Free Speech" rally on Boston Common Credit: Michael Dwyer/AP  American police had feared radical bands of counter-protesters were adding acid to their arsenal of extreme violence as they tried to disrupt far Right rallies and protests. The US has endured a hot week of demonstrations and soul-searching as the country re-examines its troubled racial history and the fall-out from Donald Trump’s tumultuous presidency. Counterprotesters hold signs before conservative organizers begin a planned "Free Speech" rally on Boston Common, Saturday Credit: AP Photo/Michael Dwyer As free speech campaigners and counter-protesters gathered in Boston for the latest potential flashpoint on Saturday, officers said they were worried militants were armed with acid. “We think it’s what they had in Charlottesville,” said one policeman, dressed all in black and equipped with a body camera, referring to violence last weekend in Virginia. “They are using hydrochloric acid or battery acid. “Their tactic now seems to be to cause so much trouble that the event just gets shut down before it can even begin.” Counter protesters gather in Roxbury before marching to the 'Free Speech Rally' on Boston Common Credit: Scott Eisen/Getty Images A law enforcement official told the Boston Globe that officers were investigating reports that radical counter-protesters were planning to throw acid. More than 600 officers yesterday patrolled fences and concrete blockades arranged on Boston Common to keep two rival rallies apart as crowds began gathering. Among them were more than 100 so-called antifa Left-wingers, wearing black scarves over their faces who paraded across the common chanting: “Nazi scum, off our streets.” Police stand by as thousands of protesters prepare to march in Boston Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images They are becoming a familiar sight as white supremacists assert their right to rally, one side in a bitter summer of discontent. The Boston event had been three months in the planning but took on greater significance after clashes in Charlottesville where a 32-year-old woman, Heather Heyer, died when a car crashed into a crowd. Organisers of a the counter protest in Boston urged people to attend amid fears that members of the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacy groups would be among those at the free speech rally. Although the rally organizers stress that they are not associated with any alt-right or white supremacist groups, the city of Boston and Police Commissioner William Evans are preparing for possible confrontations  Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images John Medlar, spokesman for Boston Free Speech which organised the rally, said such groups were not welcome. “We have made sure that one of the groups invited is not coming and have been clear that we are not neo Nazis. This has been misreported. We are only about free speech and have people from Left and Right speaking,” he said, referring to the part of the US constitution that guarantees free expression. Charlottesville far-right rally organiser is literally chased out of town 00:59 Among the confirmed guests were Joe Biggs, who used to work for the conspiracy-mongering website Infowars, as well as Shiva Ayyadurai, a scientist who claims to have invented email and is now running for the Senate. Police set strict limits banning protesters carrying anything that can be used as a weapon, as well as dogs and personal protection gear. However, that was not enough to prevent dozens of counter-protesters arriving with scarves over their faces and helmets. “It’s for protection,” said one man, who asked not to give his name. Charlottesville far-right protest In Dallas police used  horses to  break up a scuffle at a cemetery between people rallying against white supremacy and supporters of Confederate monuments. Officers riding on horseback had waited as the confrontation became more intense, but they moved in to break it up around 9 p.m. It happened at Pioneer Park, a Civil War cemetery that houses the memorial to Confederate soldiers. About 2,300 people, according to police estimates, showed up for a rally against racism at City Hall Plaza, not far from the cemetery. The group shouted," Take them down," referring to the monument.




  • Father jumps car over open drawbridge in terrifying stunt to save family

    Father jumps car over open drawbridge in terrifying stunt to save familyA father drove his car over an opening drawbridge in a death-defying stunt to avoid plunging into the water below. Terence Naphys was crossing New Jersey's Middle Thorofare Bridge with his family when its steel ramp began to lift beneath them. Mr Naphys was reportedly already near the centre of the bridge and was forced to accelerate his Toyota RAV 4 to jump the 6ft gap out of fear the car would fall 65ft into the deep bay below.




  • 6 Officers Shot in Florida and Pennsylvania, 2 Killed and 4 Wounded

    6 Officers Shot in Florida and Pennsylvania, 2 Killed and 4 WoundedThree police departments are reeling from a violent night that has left two officers dead.




  • Serena Williams' Fiancé Is A Little Shocked By Her Pregnancy Cravings

    Serena Williams' Fiancé Is A Little Shocked By Her Pregnancy CravingsHe knew there would be cravings, but not quite like this.




  • Trump struggles with presidential duties as uniter-in-chief

    Trump struggles with presidential duties as uniter-in-chiefWASHINGTON (AP) — For Susan Bro, mother of the woman killed at a rally organized by white supremacists, the president of the United States can offer no healing words.




  • Bangladesh sends back Rohingya boat carrying injured

    Bangladesh sends back Rohingya boat carrying injuredBangladesh coastguards Saturday turned back a boat carrying 31 Rohingya Muslim refugees escaping renewed army activity in their neighbouring Myanmar homeland, an official said. The push-back came after at least 500 Rohingya fled their villages in Myanmar's Rakhine state, crossing the border to take shelter in refugee camps and hills in Bangladesh's southeastern Cox's Bazar district. A coastguard patrol boat found the boat on the Naf river, which acts as a border between Bangladesh and Myanmar, as it tried to enter Cox's Bazar early in the morning.




  • John McCain Just Finished His First Round Of Chemo And Radiation Treatment

    John McCain Just Finished His First Round Of Chemo And Radiation TreatmentThe Arizona senator marked a major milestone Friday, with the completion of his first round of chemotherapy and radiation treatments.




  • Girl found 'brutally murdered' at home after texting mother about someone knocking at door

    Girl found 'brutally murdered' at home after texting mother about someone knocking at doorYhoana Arteaga was found bludgeoned to death in her family's mobile home with her clothing "in disarray", police said. There was no evidence of forced entry to the trailer in Nashville, Tennessee. The girl had suffered blunt force trauma to her body, police spokesman Don Aaron told a press conference.




  • Tribes hope for renewal in solar eclipse; not all will watch

    Tribes hope for renewal in solar eclipse; not all will watchFLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — While much of the country gawks at the solar eclipse, Bobbieann Baldwin will be inside with her children, shades drawn.




  • Neighbor, 24, Arrested After 3 Young Girls Found Murdered in Home

    Neighbor, 24, Arrested After 3 Young Girls Found Murdered in HomeHe turned 25 the day after the alleged murders.




  • Nearly 600 dead in S. Asia floods

    Nearly 600 dead in S. Asia floodsNearly 600 people have died and millions have been affected by monsoon floods in South Asia, officials said Saturday, as relief and rescue operations continued. Indian authorities sought military help in two districts of northern Uttar Pradesh state after fresh heavy rains left hundreds of villages marooned. "We have sought army's help to reach out to the affected people," T P Gupta, a senior official from the state's disaster management authority, told AFP.




  • Girl, 11, makes incredible recovery after friend poured boiling water over her during sleepover

    Girl, 11, makes incredible recovery after friend poured boiling water over her during sleepoverAn 11-year-old girl has made an incredible recovery after a friend poured boiling water over her face at a sleepover. Jamoneisha “Jamoni” Merritt was rushed to hospital with horrific burns after Aniya Grant Stuart, 12, splashed scalding water onto her while she slept at a house in the Bronx, New York, on 7 August. Aniya was charged with felony assault after the incident, which was said to be a "prank" gone horribly wrong.




  • How the Republican party quietly does the bidding of white supremacists | Russ Feingold

    How the Republican party quietly does the bidding of white supremacists | Russ FeingoldLet us finally rip off the veneer that Trump’s affinity for white supremacy is distinct from the Republican agenda. The phony claimed outrage becomes dangerous if it convinces anyone that there is a distinction between Trump’s abhorrent comments and the Republican Party agenda. It is the unmasking of the Republican party leadership.




  • Evangelical advisers stay with Trump as others criticize him

    Evangelical advisers stay with Trump as others criticize himNEW YORK (AP) — One of President Donald Trump's most steadfast constituencies has been standing by him amid his defense of a white nationalist rally in Virginia, even as business leaders, artists and Republicans turn away.




  • How Tough Mudder and its 'adult obstacle courses' became a £100m business

    How Tough Mudder and its 'adult obstacle courses' became a £100m businessOne Sunday morning, Will Dean informed his girlfriend Katie: “I am going to electrocute thousands of people.” Unfazed, she continued reading her newspaper. But the Sheffield-born founder of Tough Mudder – the now-globally successful obstacle course series which comes to Gloucestershire’s Badminton Estate this weekend – was devilishly serious. “I started calling engineering companies, saying: ‘Hello, we’re Tough Mudder, we want to shock people with electricity,’” explains Dean, 36, who launched his first “weekend obstacle course for adults” in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in May 2010, after studying a MBA at Harvard Business School. “You’d get a pause and then the line would go dead. People thought they were being pranked.” In the Tough Mudder innovations lab, human guinea pigs spend their mornings running through hay bales and dipping their extremities in buckets of ice The obstacle called Electroshock Therapy, which involves running through wires fizzing with 10,000 volts (triple the sting of your average electric fence), is now the event’s signature challenge. “As CEO, I have a unique role in all this because I am also the majority shareholder. People said: “Will, we can’t do this.” I was saying: “Yes, we can. We can have a board meeting and get it approved in two seconds. Look, it just happened…’” Dean spent five years working as a UK counter-terrorism officer in the Middle East and Afghanistan until, stifled by bureaucracy, he sought entrepreneurial fulfilment. His Harvard tutors called his business plan “optimistic”. At the inaugural edition, he prayed for 500 customers and got 4,500. There are now 130 annual Tough Mudder events in 11 countries with 3 million entrants worldwide so far. This weekend’s clientele have paid up to £139 to take on a 10- to 12-mile course littered with tunnels, nets, walls, fire, ice and mud. The company’s annual revenues now exceed $100m. Mud Run Electroshock Wire Caught on Neck 00:27 Obstacles are conjured up at an “Innovation Lab” in Pennsylvania where human guinea pigs spend their mornings running through hay bales and dipping their extremities in buckets of ice. Cry Baby, an obstacle which requires people to crawl through eye-watering smoke, was tested by spraying staff with homemade tear gas. Spider Box (a pit full of tarantulas) and Acid Rain (a container of floating acid bubbles) didn’t make the cut. “The Innovation Lab is as crazy as it sounds,” says Dean. “I joke that you will never get a Nobel Prize unless you test it on yourself. We start by saying: let’s think of the unthinkable. We finish by saying: now we have to make this work in Dubai, Germany and Mexico and get several thousand people of all shapes and sizes through in one hour. It is a strange remit.” Splashdown: a Tough Mudder comptetitor comes to grief Credit: Ben Birchall /PA Obstacle races have become wildly popular, with 5 million people in 40 countries taking part in events each year. Tough Mudder attracts a mix of couples, families, friends, work colleagues, students and executives. “The mud is a leveller,” says Dean. But why pay money to endure manufactured suffering? Dean believes the trend may be in part a reaction to our risk-averse society, with desk-bound workers seeking raw experiences to share on social media and in pub chats. But he insists the benefits are real. “I believe in challenging oneself to take on new things and I believe that is the secret to developing confidence. In a funny way, running through electric wires gives people the confidence to take on other challenges and changes in their life.” Tough Mudder's latest obstacles 01:05 He says Tough Mudder’s fun values have helped them outsmart rivals like Spartan Race, launched by Joe De Sena, a former Wall Street trader, in 2007. Miss an obstacle at Spartan Race and you have to do 30 burpees. At ToughMudder, nobody cares. Spartan Race times and ranks all contestants (accountability is the real secret to better health, insists De Sena), but Dean refuses, haunted by a 2008 triathlon when time-conscious athletes wouldn’t stop to help him unjam the zip of his wetsuit. “My belief came from me saying: I would do this. My friends would do this. I genuinely believe there is a market for a race that is not a race.” There are now 130 annual Tough Mudder events in 11 countries, with 3 million entrants worldwide so far Credit:  Andrew Crowley Dean now lives in New York with his lawyer wife Katie and their one-year-old daughter, Isobel. He still tackles the courses himself and joins in “Breakfast Club” workouts at the company’s Brooklyn HQ. His events deliberately inspire this same sense of community – what he calls his “tribe”. He hates seeing runners plodding side-by-side on gym treadmills and never speaking. His event forces you to seek help from strangers to scale walls and nets. “Tough Mudder gives you a sense of personal accomplishment, a sense of a team and being a part of something bigger than yourself, and hopefully a sense of fun.” He is not surprised it has proven popular in the UK. “More than any other culture, we believe in not taking ourselves too seriously. In our school sports, we have second and third teams. No American would play in that. It would be an embarrassment. You do get differences around the world. Germans ask six times more customer service questions. Australians sign up last-minute. But it’s a bit like kids and ice cream – it’s universal in its appeal.” Tough Mudder - are you tough enough? Next month, Dean is publishing a new business book, It Takes a Tribe, which analyses the social psychology, corporate theory and personal stories behind his success. It also documents the fierce battles that shaped the company. Dean and De Sena used to fly provocative advertising banners over each other’s events. De Sena once declared in an interview: “There’s not a person on this planet I despise more than Will Dean.” They have since bonded over lunch, but the rivalry bubbles away. “I have a lot of respect for Joe De Sena, as much as I tease him. I have said before when asked if we have anything in common: yes, we both wake up every morning and the first thing we think about is Tough Mudder. But I do think the rival philosophy has meant we ended up creating two companies which superficially may seem similar, but are very different.” “Tough Mudder gives you a sense of personal accomplishment, a sense of a team and being a part of something bigger than yourself," says founder Will Dean Credit: Andrew Crowley More troubling was the multimillion dollar lawsuit Dean faced in 2010. Billy Wilson, a former soldier who launched Tough Guy, an obstacle course in Wolverhampton in 1987, had granted Dean access to his company information for his Harvard studies and then accused him of stealing his idea. Dean countersued for defamation. After a vitriolic battle, the pair agreed a confidential settlement in 2011, with Dean reportedly paying $725,000. “There is only so much I can say, but one thing I can say is that we had to literally quadruple our pace. We weren’t just fighting for the survival of the company. Suddenly everything was on the line: personal bankruptcy, reputation. It was incredibly stressful. But it is part of the narrative now. I don’t think we would be as ambitious were it not for that experience.” The Four Phases | Chris Hall's Tough Mudder Workout Prep Aware of the perennial need to innovate, Dean has in recent years added events like Mini-Mudder (for kids) and World’s Toughest Mudder (a 24-hour elite event). He has signed television deals with CBS and Sky Sports, and he is now launching Tough Mudder boot camps around the UK, offering high-intensity, 45-minute group workouts. “There are a few things in society right now which are worrying,” he explains. “Obesity and diabetes rates are up, loneliness is up, people spend more time on social media and less time with friends. It all comes back to our mission to grow a global tribe. The boot camps are the local community hub and the event is the pilgrimage when the tribe comes together. I don’t pretend we are curing cancer. But I do think in our own small way we are making the world a better place.” For event details, go to toughmudder.co.uk. Jeep has launched a limited edition Tough Mudder Renegade: jeep.co.uk/tough-mudder




  • Two dead, six injured in Finland stabbing spree

    Two dead, six injured in Finland stabbing spreePolice shot and wounded a suspect after a stabbing spree in which a man killed two people and wounded six others in the Finnish city of Turku. Within hours of the attack on Friday the force had announced increased police patrols across the country. Two dead and six injured," Turku police tweeted after the assault in a market square.




  • Violence erupts between white nationalists, counterprotestors in Charlottesville: Part 5

    Violence erupts between white nationalists, counterprotestors in Charlottesville: Part 5White nationalists had gathered in the Virginia city to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.




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